ClimaSlow ERC

Slowing Down Climate Change: Combining Climate Law and Climate Science to Identify the Best Options to Reduce Emissions of Short-lived Climate Forcers in Developing Countries (2017-2022)


The ClimaSlow project is funded by the European Research Council for 2017-2022.

The Principal Investigator is Professor Kati Kulovesi. Other participating CCEEL members are Senior Researcher Dr Yulia Yamineva, Senior Lecturer Dr Tuula Honkonen, Researcher Maria Eugenia Recio and PhD Researcher Veera Pekkarinen. The ClimaSlow project also involves the UEF Atmospheric Aerosol Physics research group. Participating group members include Professor Kari Lehtinen, Senior Researcher Dr Thomas Kühn and PhD Researcher Tuuli Miinalainen.

The project can be followed on Twitter as @ClimaSlowERC.

The ClimaSlow project opens new interdisciplinary horizons to identify the best opportunities to strengthen the global regulatory framework for reducing emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs), with particular attention to developing countries as projected key sources of future SLCP emissions. The project’s case study countries are China, India, Chile and Mexico.  

In contrast to traditional legal analysis that would focus on one legal system or instrument, the project studies the relevant legal and regulatory frameworks comprehensively, considering the international, regional, national and transnational levels. It seeks to identify various options, to strengthen the global legal and regulatory frameworks applicable to SLCPs. In addition to providing information on best options to regulate SLCPs, this novel, comprehensive approach helps scholars to improve their understanding of the implications of ongoing changes in global legal landscape and further develop global climate change law as an emergent theoretical approach.

Publications by the ClimaSlow project include the following:

Most ClimaSlow members at a meeting in June 2018. L-R: Veera Pekkarinen (PhD researcher, law), Prof. Kati Kulovesi (PI), Prof. Kari Lehtinen (aerosol physics), Dr Thomas Kühn (aerosol physics) and Tuuli Miinalainen  (PhD researcher, aerosol physics).